(513) 398-3900

6400 Thornberry Ct, Ste 610
Mason, Ohio 45040

Newborns



You have just welcomed a brand new person into your family and the world. Congratulations! Muddy Creek Pediatrics is happy to be your partner in providing the best health and wellness care for your child for many years to come… welcome to our newest Muddy Creek Kid!

Many parents are sometimes overwhelmed by the unique care required for a newborn.   We are here to help with your questions and concerns about proper newborn care and other common topics such as breast feeding and crying.  Experience and guidance will give you confidence and peace of mind during the days and long nights ahead.  As always, feel free to call us anytime you feel you need information or guidance on health and wellness for your child.

There is a wealth of healthcare information available online.  You need to be sure, however, that the source it comes from is credible and medically sound.  Please visit our resources page for the online resources that meet our approval.  We have also provided basic information here on our website where you can start.

Preparing for Your New Baby

Safety Guidelines for Parents of Infants

Baby’s First Well Care Visit at Muddy Creek Pediatrics

Newborn Nutrition

Click here for our webpage on Feeding your Baby. Whether you are providing breastmilk or formula for your child, we want to work closely with you to pay attention to your baby’s feeding schedule and patterns and make sure your child is getting enough nutrition for growth.  It is important to keep track of when and how much your child is eating so we can discuss it during your well-child visits, or in the event any issues arise with feeding.

When to Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics

There are many reasons your baby may have feeding problems, if you are concerned you should call our office.  Call immediately if your baby has:

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Newborn Sleeping Habits

Babies do not have regular sleep cycles until about 6 months of age. While newborns sleep about 16 to 17 hours per day, they may only sleep 1 or 2 hours at a time. As babies get older, they need less sleep. However, different babies have different sleep needs.  Click here for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

When to Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics

If your baby is very irritable and cannot be soothed adequately, or if your baby is difficult to wake from sleep and seems disinterested in feeding.

Umbilical Cord Care  

You’ll need to keep the stump of the umbilical cord clean and dry as it shrivels and eventually falls off. To keep the cord dry, sponge bathe your baby rather than submersing him in a tub of water. Also keep the diaper folded below the cord to keep urine from soaking it. You may notice a few drops of blood on the diaper around the time the stump falls off; this is normal. But if the cord does actively bleed, call your baby’s doctor immediately. If the stump becomes infected, however, it will require medical treatment.

When to Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics

Although umbilical infection is quite uncommon, contact us if any of these signs are present:

 The umbilical cord stump should dry up and fall off by the time your baby is eight weeks old. If it remains beyond that time, there may be other issues at play. Call us here at Muddy Creek Pediatrics if the cord has not dried up and fallen off by the time the baby is two months old.

 Click here for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

 Diapers and Digestion 

Your newborn should have his first bowel movement some time in the first 24 hours of life. He may continue to pass meconium over the first day or so, but if he is feeding well you’ll notice that over a few days the stool goes from black to dark green to yellow in color. Breastfed babies usually pass poop that looks like Dijon mustard, watery with little whitish seedy-looking bits. Formula-fed babies may have less watery stool, usually pasty in consistency and yellow or tan in color. Many parents get concerned if they see the stool is green rather than yellow. In truth, all earth tones are fine, from yellow to green to brown.

When to Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics

There are two colors stool should not be. One is white. The other is red. Call us immediately if you discover these conditions.

 Click here for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

After Circumcision 

If you chose to have your son circumcised, the procedure probably has been performed in the hospital on the second or third day after birth, but may be done after discharge during the first week of life. Afterward, a light dressing such as gauze with petroleum jelly will have been placed over the head of the penis.   The next time the baby urinates, we recommend this dressing to come off, but sometimes we may ask you to keep a clean dressing on until the penis is fully healed. The important thing is to keep the area as clean as possible. If particles of stool get on the penis, wipe it gently with soap and water during diaper changes.  The scab at the incision line should be gone within 7 to 10 days.

When to Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics

 Click here for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

How to Respond to Your Crying Baby

All babies cry, often without any apparent cause.  Newborns cry for many reasons.  It is one of their only means of communicating their needs.  Newborns routinely cry a total of one to four hours a day. It’s part of adjusting to this new life outside the womb.

Listening to a wailing newborn can be agonizing, but letting your frustration turn to anger or panic will only intensify your infant’s screams. No parent can console her child every time she cries, so don’t expect to be a miracle worker with your baby. The more relaxed you remain, the easier it will be to console your child. Even very young babies are sensitive to tension around them and react to it by crying.  If you start to feel that you can’t handle the situation, get help from another family member or a friend. Not only will this give you needed relief, but a new face sometimes can calm your baby when all your own tricks are spent.

If you have ruled out any urgent problems, needs or health issues, sometimes the best approach is simply to leave the baby alone. Many babies cannot fall asleep without crying, and will go to sleep more quickly if left to cry for a while. The crying should not last long if the child is truly tired.

 When to Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics

If your baby is inconsolable no matter what you do, he may be sick. Check his temperature. If you take it rectally and it is over 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius), he could have an infection. Contact us immediately in this situation for an appointment.  If it is afterhours, and your baby is inconsolable or exhibits symptoms of illness, we can help you sort through the situation and help you decide whether or not your child requires urgent care.

 Click here for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

How do I Know If My Newborn is Sick?

Watch for these signs that it’s time to call us immediately for an appointment for your child.  If you dial our main number after office hours or on weekends you will reach Dr. Habel or Dr. O’Malley’s voicemail.  Follow the instructions, leave a detailed message, and they will promptly call you back, and will help you decide on the  best course of action:

Common Complications for Newborns

Jaundice is the yellow color seen in the skin of many newborns. It happens when a chemical called bilirubin builds up in the baby’s blood. Jaundice can occur in babies of any race or color.

When to Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics

Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics immediately if you notice any of the following symptoms:

 Click here for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Cradle Cap is a noninfectious skin condition that’s very common in infants, usually beginning in the first weeks of life and slowly disappearing over a period of weeks or months. Unlike eczema or contact dermatitis, it’s rarely uncomfortable or itchy.  It can spread to other areas of the skin and is then called seborrheic dermatitis.  If it is confined to his scalp (and is, therefore, just cradle cap), you can treat it yourself.

When to Call Muddy Creek Pediatrics

Call our office if your baby has seborrhea on large areas of the body, is getting worse, causing hair loss.  Call right away if the affected skin becomes firm and red, drains pus fluid, or feels warm to touch.

 Click here for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Other Common Conditions

Click here for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics.